You’re Your Biggest Asset

You know those times when filling out some financial form or statement and you have to list your assets: house, rental property, investments, bonds, vehicles… and so on it goes. We all write down or tick different things according to our situation. I always have this moment where I think, ‘I don’t have enough’, or ‘I need more things that other people have’.

I’m not sure about your culture, but in mine we keep our financial circumstances private. I live in a house – but do I own or rent? My partner has a vehicle – but does he own it, or is he paying it off? I have appliances, but again are they owned, rented, or on HP? It’s easy to look at others from the outside and start comparing based on the items you think they own, but you never really know anyone’s situation.

It’s strange to think that when we are filling out these forms, and the question is, ‘what is your largest asset, or what is your largest financial asset, that we don’t write: ‘ME‘. I am.

I am my biggest asset. I am my biggest financial asset. I am my biggest investment. Even if you are not working, you are your biggest asset – in every way.

You have to be, it doesn’t make sense to write anything else down. What you are doing, what decisions you have a head of you, what your possibilities are – is everything. YOU are your biggest asset.

It’s not often that I purchase a large asset, or an expensive item. But when I do I’m pretty chuffed. For example I once bought myself a small red French car and I LOVED IT. At first, I cleaned it, took it through car washes, bought smelly hanging things for the rear window – did all the things. I was, ‘car proud.’ Yep, that was me, it was shortly lived, but during that period I spent money, energy, time and thought on that car. It’s a pity that, even knowing I’m more important than a car I don’t always care for myself the way I cared for this vehicle.

Even though I’m my biggest asset, and always will be, I often don’t spend, money, energy, time and thought on myself. In another perspective if someone else was looking after me and treated me the way I sometimes treat myself, it would probably be called – neglect.

There are so many reasons why we end up neglecting ourselves, and often circumstances, such as financial difficulties or health come into play. However, if we understand that we are the most important person in our lives, we may just treat ourselves with a bit more respect, love, grace, and forgiveness.

Even now, it is hard to write that I’m the most important person in my own life – shouldn’t that title go to my children, partner, parents, siblings, friends… that’s what I have always told myself, that all these others come first. But now I think that it is OK to think of yourself as the most important, because it actually doesn’t negate how you feel or treat others.

For example, if I had a tool or machine that made my income for me, provided for myself and others – wouldn’t I look after it? I would probably take it in for checks, get someone in to fix it when it was needed, purchase replacement parts, keep it in good running order – because it’s an asset. So why don’t we do that for ourselves? Logically it makes sense to keep ourselves healthy, spend time on ourselves, rest, do all the things to keep us going, so we can work, provide for our families and spend time with others.

If this makes sense, then why are we doing everything-but looking after ourselves? Laurie Buchanan, PhD states:

Self-care is a deliberate choice to gift yourself with people, places, things, events, and opportunities that recharge our personal battery and promote whole health — body, mind, and spirit.

We need to take stock of what is important to us and include those things/people in our lives. It’s not easy, I can be so harsh on myself, the energy I do use on myself can be so negative – but lately, especially since starting this blog – I’ve been really facing myself a lot more and realising I need to spend money, energy, time and thought on myself to sustain a fulfilled and creative life.

I will leave you with this wonderful quote from Kamal Ravikant:

Any negative thought is darkness. How do you remove it? Do you fight fear or worry? Do you push or drown away sadness and pain? Doesn’t work. Instead, imagine you’re in a dark room and it’s bright outside. Your job is to go to the window, pull out a rag, and start cleaning. Just clean. And soon enough, light enters naturally, taking the darkness away.

Catch you next week xx

One Comment

  1. I found this really worth reading and considering, I’ve never thought of myself as an asset. Taking care of myself has always been secondary to the others around me, like my family. Thanks for giving me some things to really think about.

    Liked by 1 person

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